A Sermon by Lia Scholl based on Exodus 1:8-14 and 3:1-15 In this morning’s text, we find the Hebrew people living in Egypt. Remember how they got there? Joseph, the favorite son of Jacob, in Canaan was thrown into a pit by his own brothers who were jealous of his fancy coat. Joseph was taken to Egypt, where he ascended to the head of food storage, and when his father and brothers ran from famine they found their forgiving brother welcoming them in Egypt. Then a new Pharaoh came to Egypt, and he did not know Joseph or the Hebrew people, and he feared them.Read More →

a sermon by Lia Scholl on 1 Kings 19. Y’all probably know the story of Elijah, but let me recap a bit. Elijah was a prophet. He had some amazing powers. Sometimes he could read the signs and see the future. He made a little jar of oil and flour feed a household for days. He raised a young man from the dead. He once met up with an evil despot named Ahab. Ahab was king of Israel, and married to Jezebel, who was perhaps more wicked than her wicked husband. Jezzie had killed 150 prophets of our God. Elijah was the only prophet left.Read More →

In the last couple of weeks, we’ve been talking about the Holy Spirit. We started with John 3:8, the Spirit blows where she will—and compared our lives to a kite, where we must be tethered to the ground, but not too tightly tethered, because we have to be able to be picked up by the Spirit. And then we considered the fruits of the Spirit—love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, and self-control, and asked the Spirit to come into our lives, to help us manifest these gifts. So I tried to draw a picture of the Spirit in our lives tried to answer what itRead More →

a sermon by Lia Scholl Last week we talked about John 3:8, and the Holy Spirit, and how she blows where she chooses, and you hear the sound of her, but you do not know where she comes from or where she goes. And I compared the Holy Spirit in our lives to the wind that picks up a kite—and the balance between being tethered to the ground, like a kite must be, but also must be free to fly. If we are too tightly tethered, whether to the past, to conflict, or to control, we will not thrive. But then I found myself asking,Read More →

This Sunday we will pray a prayer about Charlottesville written by Lauren Grubaugh, then a Divinity student, now an ordained minister. It’s nearly two years since that day. That day in the heat in Charlottesville lives in my memory as a dark day, a day that made me wonder if this is what civil war would like like. And a day that stayed in my dreams for months. I’m not so sure we’re better off today. In many ways, we things may be worse. The deaths in El Paso, the Gilroy Garlic Festival, and the ongoing crisis in Black, brown, and LGBTQ+ communities bring backRead More →